The Di Sipio’s winery rises at Ripa Teatina, between the peaks of the Maiella mountain that overlook the Teatine valleys: it is a 70-hectare estate, wet by the waters of its natural lake.

Azienda Nicola Di Sipio is a modern oenological complex that rises up amidst the vineyards of the estate. It was designed by engineer and architect Rocco Valentini and it is fully integrated with the land and with the prior 17th century country house.

The decision to maintain the harvest places near to those dedicated to the production of wine was made due to the need to minimise the temperature changes while grapes are being transported. The winery has spaces for different uses, as for instance grape processing, vinification, bottling, and last but not least, a room for wine tasting and for private events. From the outside, one can see a multi-storey-building that is completely in-ground if compared to the villa. By doing that, it was possible to make the most of the stable underground temperatures and at the same time it was possible to rise a belvedere in the upper level, which has direct access to the prior villa. The big two-storey semi-circular base recalls the old constructions in the Abruzzesi villages, which were built in bricklaying with broad arch openings. This structure incorporates the winery at the back hill. The double-high structure embraces the property, in which three different building envelopes are evident: the external one made from local Erractic sandstone, a stone that comes out of the soil and is in line with the surrounding environment; the intermediate one made from reclaimed bricks found in the villa; finally, the internal one, made from glass and steel. To make all levels communicate (a metaphor to the several building time layers), there is a spiral steel staircase, designed by the architect. At lower level one finds the real winery: a place for wine production, storage, bottling and ageing. Here, floor and wall covering colours vary from the warm wine hues to the warm earth nuances; natural light is granted thanks to wide glass windows that, together with the basement windows, collect the light straight from the level of the terrace and reflect it full height. The intermediate level hosts the tasting room, the wine cellar, the floor-to-ceiling winery space and circulation areas. Particularly in the tasting room the pattern of the suspended ceiling is made from weathering steel (COR-TEN steel) where one can see integrated led light cuts, the cromatic effects of which recall the surrounding scenary of plowed fields. Its reflections evoke the irregular vegetation of an Abruzzo Tendone (Pergola) vineyard (typical training system in Abruzzo). This room is next to the production area, and it is coated with pyramidal panels to obtain acustic protection to mid and high frequencies; weathering steel (COR-TEN steel) was used for the low ones; also the angled arranged glass walls prevent the still waves to be formed. There is a less bright second room, which ends with a steel and glass box suspended over the valley; glass only separates this room from the wine cellar. The jutting steel element leans on a sandstone-based-base and it juts over the vineyards and over the landscape, while the glass and white stone pavement recalls the peebles near the seashore. The wine cellar is termically protected from the upper rooftop garden, it is also visible from the lower cellar throughout a crack in the wall that repoduces the pattern of its pillar broken lines. The upper floor, which is at the same level of the 17thcentury villa, develops into a semi-circular wide terrace which is demarcated by the brick banister. The pavement of the terrace is covered with bricks crossed by gutters to collect rain water. Finally, there is a hanging garden next to the belvedere, dotted with designed weathering steel (COR-TEN) furnishings; there is also a main structure, a porch made out of an old barn that has two glassed spaces at its edges where, during the montepulciano harvest, the grapes come down directly into the tanks through “manholes” that take advantage of gravity to minimise the use of pomps that could damage the grape skins. Materials, colours and light interlace in the internal and external areas of the winery, guiding the visitor through spaces that embody the philosophy of the Di Sipio Family, which is in harmony with tradition (stone and bricks) and with innovation (corten, steel, glass and industrial cement coatings)

Courtesy of Rocco Valentini

The Di Sipio’s winery rises at Ripa Teatina, between the peaks of the Maiella mountain that overlook the Teatine valleys: it is a 70-hectare estate, wet by the waters of its natural lake.

Azienda Nicola Di Sipio is a modern oenological complex that rises up amidst the vineyards of the estate. It was designed by engineer and architect Rocco Valentini and it is fully integrated with the land and with the prior 17th century country house.

The decision to maintain the harvest places near to those dedicated to the production of wine was made due to the need to minimise the temperature changes while grapes are being transported. The winery has spaces for different uses, as for instance grape processing, vinification, bottling, and last but not least, a room for wine tasting and for private events. From the outside, one can see a multi-storey-building that is completely in-ground if compared to the villa. By doing that, it was possible to make the most of the stable underground temperatures and at the same time it was possible to rise a belvedere in the upper level, which has direct access to the prior villa. The big two-storey semi-circular base recalls the old constructions in the Abruzzesi villages, which were built in bricklaying with broad arch openings. This structure incorporates the winery at the back hill. The double-high structure embraces the property, in which three different building envelopes are evident: the external one made from local Erractic sandstone, a stone that comes out of the soil and is in line with the surrounding environment; the intermediate one made from reclaimed bricks found in the villa; finally, the internal one, made from glass and steel. To make all levels communicate (a metaphor to the several building time layers), there is a spiral steel staircase, designed by the architect. At lower level one finds the real winery: a place for wine production, storage, bottling and ageing. Here, floor and wall covering colours vary from the warm wine hues to the warm earth nuances; natural light is granted thanks to wide glass windows that, together with the basement windows, collect the light straight from the level of the terrace and reflect it full height. The intermediate level hosts the tasting room, the wine cellar, the floor-to-ceiling winery space and circulation areas. Particularly in the tasting room the pattern of the suspended ceiling is made from weathering steel (COR-TEN steel) where one can see integrated led light cuts, the cromatic effects of which recall the surrounding scenary of plowed fields. Its reflections evoke the irregular vegetation of an Abruzzo Tendone (Pergola) vineyard (typical training system in Abruzzo). This room is next to the production area, and it is coated with pyramidal panels to obtain acustic protection to mid and high frequencies; weathering steel (COR-TEN steel) was used for the low ones; also the angled arranged glass walls prevent the still waves to be formed. There is a less bright second room, which ends with a steel and glass box suspended over the valley; glass only separates this room from the wine cellar. The jutting steel element leans on a sandstone-based-base and it juts over the vineyards and over the landscape, while the glass and white stone pavement recalls the peebles near the seashore. The wine cellar is termically protected from the upper rooftop garden, it is also visible from the lower cellar throughout a crack in the wall that repoduces the pattern of its pillar broken lines. The upper floor, which is at the same level of the 17thcentury villa, develops into a semi-circular wide terrace which is demarcated by the brick banister. The pavement of the terrace is covered with bricks crossed by gutters to collect rain water. Finally, there is a hanging garden next to the belvedere, dotted with designed weathering steel (COR-TEN) furnishings; there is also a main structure, a porch made out of an old barn that has two glassed spaces at its edges where, during the montepulciano harvest, the grapes come down directly into the tanks through “manholes” that take advantage of gravity to minimise the use of pomps that could damage the grape skins. Materials, colours and light interlace in the internal and external areas of the winery, guiding the visitor through spaces that embody the philosophy of the Di Sipio Family, which is in harmony with tradition (stone and bricks) and with innovation (corten, steel, glass and industrial cement coatings)

Courtesy of Rocco Valentini

AZIENDA NICOLA DI SIPIO

Good synthesis of land, grape variety and man’s hand

Azienda Nicola Di Sipio - Ripa Teatina (Chieti - Abruzzo)
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